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Murase Taiitsu (1803-1881)
Nanga / Bunjin
Shikunshi, the ‘four gentlemen’ (orchid, bamboo, plum and chrysanthemum)
Signed: Taiitsu nanajûkyuô giboku heidai
Seals: Taiitsu Rôjin sanzetsu, Nôzan sanboku, Hakusetsu (top)
Technique: sumi on paper 141 x 46,6
Date: Summer of 1881
Mounting: light blue silk
wooden rollers, 199 x 59
Condition: Lightly soiled and a stain, otherwise good


荊棘埋蹤跡
分亳不染塵
清香唯自愛
幽谷是佳人

Orchid
Imbedded in thorns and brambles
Yet in no way stained with dust,
Its pure fragrance known only to itself,
In the secluded valley it is like a beautiful woman.
(Addiss)
Comp. Addiss # 8, Sôjin ‘88 # 27


水草 
水草花三兩
凉風動有聲
晚來過雨後
池上影清明

Water plants
The water plant blooms with two, three flowers,
A chilly wind makes everything rustle.
After the rain cleared away in the evening,
The moon shines brightly on the surface of the pond.
(HK)



黄々映白々       
香動絶風塵         
春色曽無意             
東籬是逸人

Chrysanthemum
The yellow reflects the white,
Scent pervades the swirling dust.
The sight of spring has now lost its meaning.
At the eastern hedge stands a withdrawn and neglected man.
(HK)
Comp. Sôjin ‘81 # 27, Sôjin ‘88 # 28 & p. 44

                            
Tao Yuanming (365–427), also known as Tao Qian, was a Chinese poet who is often regarded as the greatest poet of the Six Dynasties era (c. 220–589). Disgust at the corruption and intrigues of the court prompted him to withdraw from public life: “Life is too short to compromise on principles”.



溪水凝無響        
横枝衝玉塵        
百花紅未點        
雪裏占春人     

Japanese apricot
The brook freezes over without a sound,
Horizontal branches catch the jade dust.
The red dots of the flowers are not yet visible,
Snow piles up on the people of spring.
(HK)

The expression ‘jade dust’ refers to snowflakes.

Availability: On Request