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7.1 Nakajima Raishô (1796-1871) with Eiraku Hozen XI (1795-1854)
Kyôyaki
Chawan, tea bowl - Yabakochi, small Nanten
Signed: Raishô ga
Seals: Kahin Shiriyu
Technique: Wheel-turned grey gohonde kyôyaki with an underglaze decoration in blue and brown Ø 13 x 7
Box: Inscribed
Condition: With 2 gold lacquer restored stress cracks, otherwise fine

Raishô was born in Ôtsu and he was a pupil of the influential Nangaku and later of Maruyama Ôzui (1766-1829). He was an important painter, who attracted equally important students like Konô Bairei (1844-1895) and Kawabata Gyokushô (1842-1913). On January 17th 1868 the art organization the Joun-sha was founded, with Raishô as their oldest core member.

With Yokoyama Kazan (1784-1837), Shiokawa Bunrin (1801-1877) and Kishi Renzan (1805-1859), Raishô was considered one of the four great masters of Kyoto at the end of the Edo period.


Reference:
Roberts p. 127
Araki p. 1203
Kyoto '98 p. 288
Hillier pp. 332-335

Eiraku Hozen XI (Nishimura Zengorō XI / Kahin Shiriyu / Konan Hozen) is classed as one of the foremost potters in the records of Kyoto wares, together with Aoki Mokubei (1767-1833) and Nin’ami Dôhachi (1783-1855).

At the age of 13 Hozen was adopted by Nishimura (Eiraku) Ryozen, the tenth-generation head of a family making doburo (earthenware braziers) for the tea ceremony, and took the name Nishimura Zengorō XI. With Ryozen in Kyoto he learned to produce sometsuke (blue-and-white) and kinrande (gold-and-enamel) wares, but was also skilled in other techniques, and became a major influence on later Kyoto potters for his use of coloured glazes.

He passed the family headship on to his son, Wazen (1823-1896), in 1849 and travelled to Edo. Hozen spent his final years at a new kiln in Miidera, Shiga prefecture, producing what came to be known as Konan (‘south of the lake’) ware, and later, at another kiln, Nagarayama ware.

Reference:
Roberts p. 50

Availability: On Request